All posts in Technology

Horizon and cookies

openstack-logo-100x100

I’ve been working with the Havanna release of OpenStack the last couple of days and ran across a default setting that should be avoided in any deployment: using cookies as the session backend.

The source of the problems has been known at least since October 2013  in Django and other frameworks: clear-text client-side session management.
There is even OSVDB entry and Threatpost covered it in an article.

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Social over-sharing

Image from www.avgjoeguide.com

In some parts of the world over-sharing or just sharing information about you, your life-style and family can be really dangerous. There are many types of information one can over-share on the Internet, typically on social media sites like Facebook, Twitter, Google+ or Foursquare :

  • Personal information, for example: name, maiden name, birthday, schools we attended, who are our friends and family, pictures.
  • Geo-location or location information: this information tells people where you are and where to find you. Keep Reading →

Measuring community activity in Cloud Computing projects

3d_pie_chart

I normally try to stick to posting original content on my site, but I ran across this post today while doing some research for the Hacker High School project.

It presents a really well structured analysis of the communities that support and give life to the main Cloud Computing projects: OpenStack, CloudStack, Eucalyptus and OpenNebula. All the information was extracted from public forums and code management systems.

You can find the post here: http://t.co/qmwUUcsiHu

Executive summary

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Smart phone / mobile phone tracking and privacy

renew+orb

The first hand-held mobile phone was demonstrated by Motorola in 1973 and since 90s, mobile phones have become one of the technologies that have the biggest impact on the way we live. Cell phones or mobile phones have reached an impressive 96.2% of the world population and have penetrations rates of over 100% in developed nations. This information technology has spread faster that any other, including TV, Radio and the Internet. Can you remember how we lived before cellphones?

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vpnc and Fritz!box

Fritz!Box is a series of home routers from AVM, which can do a lot. Among the features is  VPN support: site-to-site and client-to-site (road warrior).

I wanted to play with the road warrior setup, because it is always practical to have a way back into a network: for privacy if on a hot spot or just to be able to access hosts on it.

Fritzbox deliverers it own Windows / Mac VPN client (FRITZ!Box VPN Connection) which works pretty good, but as a Linux user I would really enjoy native support (so I don’t have to get access through a VM, which works pretty well by the way).

After multiple failing tests and toggling all possible vpnc configuration options, which aren’t that many by the way, it was time to play: find the differences!

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Adoption of Linux releases

I’m impressed how some software Vendor have resisted to provide support for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 (RHEL6) and its derivates for their products. This week I ran into two examples:

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WebOS Security

I had the pleasure of attending WebOS Developer Workshop in Mainz on Saturday Thgtwi (@thgtwi) did a great job with the organization. SuVuK(@SuVuK_open) did a nice report on the contents of the Workshop in his blog.

I took the opportunity talk about Security in the WebOS platform. I ran some tests based on WebOS 3.X, which is currently available for the HP TouchPad and is being opensourced as Open WebOS. Keep Reading →

Implementing effective controls: Venezuela to block stolen mobile phones

Even though a don’t agree with many of the decisions and laws created in Venezuela, I think this is great example of implementing a control for a big risk. Keep Reading →

Empathy and MSN

I’ve had some problems recently (the last couple of weeks) with Empathy on Ubuntu 10.04. All my MSN accounts just started giving my an “Authentication Failed”.

After checking with pidgin, which I use for other accounts, that my credentials were still working I found a post in the Ubuntu Forums that gave me a good solution:

$ sudo aptitude remove telepathy-butterfly
– Make sure you have telepathy-haze installed, if not
$ sudo aptitude install telepathy-haze
– Delete the accounts and recreate them with the new plugin

I’m not sure why this happened, but at least it’s working again.
Hope this helps someone else out there.

ooimpress and .pps files

I’ve been working with Ubuntu lately at the day job and the Open Office setup is different than on Fedora.  One special case is the opening of .pps files, which per default go into “presentation mode” which I normally hate to see (it just takes to long to see what you really what to see in the presentation.

This is a workaround I found around in the Web:
Create ~/bin/ooimpress-edit or if you want to use it system wide /usr/local/bin/ooimpress-edit; and add the following code into it

#!/bin/bash
ooimpress -n “$*”
exit

Use it when ever you think you need it.  I set it up as default behaviour in the browser.

Enjoy

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